Polyunsaturated Fats. Naturally occurring polyunsaturated fats are good (like found in meat and fish).  But, processed polyunsaturated fats are bad for you. In general, polyunsaturated fats are unstable and not suitable for high-heat cooking. Polyunsaturated fats include omega 3 and omega 6 fats which are essential fatty acids that your body needs for brain function and cell growth.

Low carb diet enthusiasts also commonly point to the insulin-carbohydrate hypothesis, claiming that cutting carbs will help you store less body fat. This theory is based off the fact that higher carb intake increases insulin secretion, and insulin plays an important role in distributing and storing energy by promoting glucose uptake into your body's cells - including your muscle, liver and fat cells. Because of this, insulin technically promotes fat storage. However, it is more complex than that. Insulin is not the only hormone that promote fat storage and research continues to suggest that fat storage primarily occurs when you eat too many calories, not carbs in particular (3). 
You’re so welcome Jessica – you and me both! I’m looking forward to feeling good again and having my clothes fit right will be nice too! ha ha! Thanks to all of your feedback I’ll be posting 7 day menu plans every Saturday, and we’ll all hopefully be reporting our pounds lost so far progress in the comments. I’m so looking forward to it – hope you’ll join us!!!
Wondering how many carb foods you can eat and still be “in ketosis”? The traditional ketogenic diet, created for those with epilepsy consisted of getting about 75 percent of calories from sources of fat (such as oils or fattier cuts of meat), 5 percent from carbohydrates and 20 percent from protein. For most people a less strict version (what I call a “modified keto diet”) can still help promote weight loss in a safe, and often very fast, way.

That doesn’t mean you’ll go hungry on a diet. It’s quite the opposite! You’re not starving yourself of calories but of carbohydrates. Your body won’t go into what’s known as starvation mode, which is where your metabolic rate drops considerably. You’re adding more fat to the diet and taking out the carbs, so the metabolism can still work, and you get the energy you need.
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